Position Statements and Resolutions Approved by the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society

These Position Statements and Resolutions were approved by the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society. Through the Executive Board or the Conservation Affairs Committee, the viewpoints of the Chapter on environmental issues are expressed. However, position statements do not carry the weight nor fully express the Chapter membership's commitment like the passing of a resolution. Webster defined a resolution as:"A formal determination, or expression of opinion, of a deliberative assembly or other body of persons." Unlike position statements, resolutions are passed by membership vote, generally at the annual meeting.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

AZ 1. Resolution on Phreatophyte Clearing Projects
AZ 2. Resolution on Teach-In
AZ 3. Resolution on Mountain Lion As A Big Game Animal
AZ 4. Resolution on the Grand Canyon
AZ 5. Position Statement In Opposition To The Central Arizona Project
AZ 6. Resolution on Professional Standing
AZ 7. Resolution on the Moratorium on Livestock Grazing on Public and State Lands in Portions of Arizona
AZ 8. Resolution Relative to the Introduction of Certain Federal Legislation Concerned With Management of Resident, Marine and Migratory Wildlife Solely on the Basis of Protective Concepts
AZ 9. Resolution Regarding Transfer of Public Lands to Indian Tribes
AZ 10. Resolution Relative to Requiring Environmental Impact Statements for Issuing Grazing Permits on Federal Lands
AZ 11. Resolution Pertaining to the Reintroduction of Wolves into Historic Ranges of Arizona and New Mexico
AZ 12. Resolution Pertaining to the Reintroduction of the Grizzly Bear Into Arizona And New Mexico
AZ 13. Resolution Pertaining to Permitting Natural Fires On Public Lands
AZ 14. Resolution Pertaining to Construction Of Swift Trail (Highway 366)
AZ 15. Position Statement on the Proposed Subdivision In San Rafael Valley, Santa Cruz County, Arizona
AZ 16. Position Statement Relative To The Flood Control Project, Gila River And Tributaries Downstream From Painted Rock Reservoir, Arizona
AZ 17. Resolution Pertaining to the "Gun’s Of Autumn"
AZ 18. Resolution Pertaining to Feral Burros
AZ 19. Resolution Pertaining to Dissolution of the Arizona-New Mexico Subsection
AZ 20. Resolution Opposing The Sagebrush Rebellion
AZ 21. Resolution Pertaining to the Tax Checkoff
AZ 22. Resolution On The Preservation Of Old Growth Coniferous Forest Habitat
AZ 23. Resolution On The Legislation For The Preservation And Enhancement Of Riparian Habitats In The Private Sector
AZ 24. Resolution Pertaining to Integrated Resource Management Of Arizona's National Forests
AZ 25. Resolution For Endorsement And Support Of Project Wild
AZ 26. Resolution For Consideration On "Wildlife User Fees For Federal Lands In Arizona"
AZ 27. Resolution On The Sikes Act Wildlife Habitat Stamp Program For Arizona
AZ 28. Resolution On An Arizona Environmental Policy Act

AZ 1. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society on Phreatophyte Clearing Projects

Whereas, Arizona is recognized nationally for its superior white-winged and mourning dove hunting with an annual harvest of over 1,700,000 birds by over 40,000 sportsmen and

Whereas, the future dove populations depend directly on the available riparian vegetation commonly referred to as phreatophytes located along the rivers and streams of Arizona for nesting habitat and

Whereas, large numbers of other small game, song and insectivorous birds, big game, waterfowl and several bird species listed in the rare and endangered fish and wildlife report depend on these riparian areas for cover and

Whereas, the mesquite bosque has historic significance and

Whereas, the hunting, bird watching and other recreation uses of these areas contribute an appreciable sum to the economy of Arizona and

Whereas, vegetation clearing projects are either completed, authorized, proposed or programmed for every major waterway supporting noteworthy amounts of such vegetation in Arizona and other streams in the Pacific Southwest and

Whereas, the completion of these projects will result in a significant loss of Arizona's dove harvest, potential elimination of several rare and endangered bird species in Arizona, elimination of valuable small game, big game and waterfowl habitat, and elimination of an historic desert habitat type — the mesquite bosque from the Pacific Southwest and

Whereas, the projects authorized to date are designed to serve a single use at the expense of existing uses in conflict with the multiple use management principle and

Now, Therefore Be It Resolved that the New Mexico-Arizona Section of the Wildlife Society on February 7, 1969, holds that this type project is not in the best interest of the resources involved and is opposed in principle to implementation of phreatophyte eradication projects detrimental to wildlife.

Now Be It Further Resolved that this resolution be mailed to the following: Secretary of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Army Corps of Engineers.

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AZ 2. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society on Teach-In

Whereas, U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson, D-Wisc. and Pete McClosky, R-Calif. are sponsoring a

movement that will channel the tremendous energies of the youth of America into a National Teach-In on the Environment to be held on university campuses throughout the country on April 22, and;

Whereas, this Teach-In is designed to focus attention onto environmental problems, and;

Whereas, these environmental problems include air pollution, water pollution, urban sprawl, pesticide abuse, destruction of wildlife habitat, and the problem at the root of all these, human overpopulation, and;

Whereas, these problems are of grave concern to the members of the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society,

Therefore Be It Resolved that the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society commend Senators Nelson and McClosky, and;

Be It Further Resolved that the members of the Chapter offer professional assistance to the local organizers of the Teach-In.

(Copies sent to Senators Nelson and McClosky)

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AZ 3. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society on Mountain Lion as a Big Game Animal

Whereas, bills have been introduced into both houses of the Arizona Legislature that would change the status of the mountain lion in Arizona to that of a "big game animal", and;

Whereas, the mountain lion is considered a trophy animal by sportsmen, and;

Whereas, provisions can be made to deal with stock killing individual lions, and;

Whereas, all of the other eleven western states have classified the mountain lion as a big game animal or they have legislation pending to that effect,

Therefore Be It Resolved that the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society recommend that the Arizona law be revised to include the mountain lion as a big game animal.

(Copies sent to Governor Williams and Chairman of the Natural Resources Committee)

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AZ 4. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society on the Grand Canyon

Whereas, Senator Clifford Case of New Jersey has introduced into the U.S. Senate a bill (S-2360) that would increase the size of the Grand Canyon National Park to 2.14 million acres or approximately three times its present size, and;

Whereas, the additional acreage would include 403,000 acres of National Forest land, 307,000 acres of Bureau of Land Management land, 40,000 acres of private land, and 50,000 acres of Arizona state-owned land, and;

Whereas, the inclusion of the additional land for a "buffer zone" is not necessary to insure public appreciation of the Grand Canyon, and;

Whereas, the Kaibab National Forest has been well recognized for its successful multiple-use management practices commensurate with conservation principles, and;

Whereas, this additional land would include much of the prime deer range of the North Kaibab deer herd, and;

Whereas, the bill would remove from active management the essential habitat of the Kaibab deer herd and House Rock buffalo herd, and

Whereas, a protectionist policy for the Kaibab deer herd has been found to be unsatisfactory in the past, and;

Whereas, in order to actively manage wildlife populations, it is often desirable to remove surplus animals and manipulate habitat by techniques that are not normally compatible with National Park policy, and;

Whereas, certain adjustments of the Park boundary could be made to include areas essential to perpetuate the unique character of the Grand Canyon without jeopardizing wildlife areas that need to be actively manipulated to ensure maximal recreational and resource use by the public,

Therefore Be It Resolved that the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society express its opposition to S-2360 which is not in the best interest of the public or the resources.

(Copies sent to Senators Case, Goldwater, Fannin, and Representatives Steiger, Rhodes, and Udall)

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AZ 5. Position Statement of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society in Opposition to the Central Arizona Project

Be It Resolved That The Arizona Chapter Of The Wildlife Society Is Opposed To The Central Arizona Project For The Following Reasons:

Channelization of most of the remaining sections of the Colorado River with its inherent detrimental effects on wildlife is an integral part of the project;

Removal or desecration of wildlife habitat through "phreatophyte control", a procedure on which the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society has taken a position of opposition, is written into the Project;

The construction, maintenance, and impact of the delivery systems, dams, and other features of the Project would have a detrimental effect on wildlife habitat;

The Central Arizona Project, as proposed, has not met the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act and no study of its detrimental effects on the ecology of Arizona has been initiated;

and most important,

The philosophy deeming the Central Project necessary is incompatible with the goals and standards of The Wildlife Society, and this attempt toward a "solution" of the consequences of Arizona's aridity will not be achieved without undetermined serious effects on the environment.

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AZ 6. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society on Professional Standing

One of the main objectives of The Wildlife Society, Inc. is: "To maintain high professional standards among those employed in the wildlife field." This is also one of the main objectives of the New Mexico-Arizona Section and the Arizona State Chapter of The Wildlife Society. Professional employees working for the State of Arizona in the wildlife profession have experience a degrading of professional standards dictated by the newly formed Personnel Commission. The elimination of the Wildlife Management degree requirements for several key wildlife positions was accomplished by this Commission without due consideration for the professional requirements for the positions. It is imperative that we influence and convince the personnel managers and administrators who have reason to employ wildlife professionals in previously established wildlife positions, that we as professionals, continue to perform as such and that the changing of position standards at the discretion of an uninformed political body will not necessarily establish the criteria for the position requirements.

Whereas, Colleges and Universities offer B.S. and advanced degrees for the profession of Wildlife Management;

Whereas, the profession of Wildlife Management and Biology is accepted, as such, by private industry, Federal and State Governments;

Whereas, individuals completing the degree requirements for qualifying for these professional positions and are employed in the pursuit of their profession, should be given proper consideration for any change in the position qualifications which would tend to alter the original position requirements by which they were employed.

Now, Therefore Be It Resolved that the Arizona State Chapter of The Wildlife Society will strongly challenge any effort, by any organization who attempts to degrade, in any way, the profession of Wildlife Management.

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AZ 7. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society on the Moratorium on Livestock Grazing on Public and State Lands in Portions of Arizona

Whereas, Arizona has known a history of excessive numbers of livestock being grazed on public lands; and,

Whereas, many historical and present grazing practices have resulted in range deterioration that is still in evidence; and,

Whereas, many past grazing practices have removed ground cover with a subsequent rise in soil temperatures; and,

Whereas, increased soil temperatures promote changes in ecological conditions and, subsequently, vegetation; and,

Whereas, many grazing practices continuously contribute to range deterioration; and,

Whereas, removal of ground cover also promotes acceleration of soil erosion and water run-off; and,

Whereas, determination of numbers of grazing animals are often based on economics rather than by available forage; and,

Whereas, permitted livestock numbers are often allotted without regard to annual climatic changes; and,

Whereas, continuous range deterioration provides the conditions where livestock are directly competing for food nutrient with native wildlife; and,

Whereas, The Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society recognizes that the federal public land use agencies are currently attempting to adequately manage lands under their respective jurisdiction but are subject to political pressure; and,

Whereas, public land use agencies have the knowledge to recognize resource deterioration and to commend restorative land use practices,

Now, Therefore Be It Resolved that the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society urge that a review of all Federal and State public lands be made by the respective agencies and that wherever the range shows a downward trend, the appropriate agency be urged to reverse this trend through proper management procedures. If ranges are depleted to the extent that management or readjustment of stocking rates cannot conceivably reverse this trend, all livestock should be removed and grazing terminated.

And Be It Further Resolved that copies of this resolution be sent to Mr. William D. Hurst, Regional Forester, U.S. Forest Service, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Mr. Joe T. Fallini, State Director, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Phoenix, Arizona, and to Mr. Andrew L. Bettwy, Commissioner of Public Lands, Arizona Land Department, Phoenix, Arizona.

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AZ 8. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Relative to the Introduction of Certain Federal Legislation Concerned With Management of Resident, Marine and Migratory Wildlife Solely on the Basis of Protective Concepts

Whereas, numerous bills have recently been introduced into the Congress of the United States calling for the complete protection of marine mammals (HR 6554, HR 6558, S 1315, S 685), the prohibition of steel traps (S 2084, HR 8784, HR 12275), protection of feral horses and burros (HR 11075), protection of all birds of prey (HR 10482), protection of all wild predatory mammals (HR 689, SB 273) and others; and,

Whereas, bills of this nature which attempt to manage wildlife through legislation are expected to be introduced with increasing frequency; and,

Whereas, these bills are not designed to provide proper management of animal populations nor insure survival of the particular species; and,

Whereas, these bills usually do not acknowledge the ecological reasons governing the abundance of a given species; and,

Whereas, these bills often interfere with successful state and federal management programs and responsibilities; and,

Whereas, these bills attempt to legislate "protective" concepts in respect to wild animals as individuals; and,

Whereas, in many instances these bills could jeopardize the survival of populations by reducing or negating their economic worth and resource value,

Now, Therefore Be It Resolved that the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society is opposed to the aforementioned bills and will protest future bills of this nature.

And, Be It Further Resolved that copies of this resolution be sent to the Arizona Federal Congressional Delegation.

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AZ 9. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Regarding Transfer of Public Lands to Indian Tribes 

Whereas, a large amount of public land has been transferred to quasi-private ownership for specific Indian tribes through the Indian Claims Commission, and

Whereas, administration of other public lands have been transferred to specific Indian tribes by executive order from the Secretary of Interior where no valid legal claims exist, and

Whereas, most of these land ownership transfers involve existing wildlife areas of high value including National Wildlife Refuges, and

Whereas, these land ownership transfers effectively eliminate preservation and management of the wildlife resources on millions of acres for the public owners, and

Whereas, the public and state agencies responsible for the welfare of the resident wildlife resources on these areas normally are given no opportunity to provide testimony,

Now, Therefore Be It Resolved that the Arizona-New Mexico Section of The Wildlife Society holds the following statements to be true and self-evident:

No transfer of ownership or administration of public lands should be made to Indian tribes except through the established procedures of the Indian Claims Commission. The nation's public lands should not be used by the Indian Claims Commission as coffers to liquidate valid claims of natives or Indians.

Be It Further Resolved that the Section urges adoption of these two basic principles for future policy decisions by the Secretary of Interior and the Indian Claims Commission.

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AZ 10. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Relative to Requiring Environmental Impact Statements for Issuing Grazing Permits on Federal Lands

Whereas, the public lands provide the American people with vital recreational opportunities and natural resources of great economic importance; and

Whereas, most of the wildlife habitat in the western United States is on these public lands; and

Whereas, livestock grazing is and has affected the carrying capacity of wildlife on these public lands; and

Whereas, it is of the utmost importance to the American people that environmental degradation of the public lands be avoided and corrected; and

Whereas, livestock grazing has been shown to have a significant major impact on the environment; now

Therefore Be It Resolved that the New Mexico-Arizona Section of The Wildlife Society requests that the administrators of those lands in public ownership prepare detailed environmental impact statements previous to the issuance of grazing permits on federal lands; and

Be It Further Resolved that copies of this Resolution be sent to the President of the United States, the Chairman of the Council on Environmental Quality, the Director of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Secretary of the Interior, the Secretary of Agriculture, the Chief of the United States Forest Service, the Director of the Bureau of Land Management, the Director of the United States Park Service, the Regional Administrators and Supervisors for the United States Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and National Park Service in Arizona and New Mexico, and members of the Arizona and New Mexico Congressional Delegation.

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AZ 11. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Pertaining to the Reintroduction of Wolves into Historic Ranges of Arizona and New Mexico

Whereas, wolves formerly occupied large areas of Arizona and New Mexico; and

Whereas, wolves have been completely extirpated from Arizona and New Mexico for several decades; and

Whereas, there remain large areas of habitat in Arizona and New Mexico in public ownership within the former distribution of wolves; and

Whereas, the New Mexico-Arizona Section of The Wildlife Society is of the philosophy that species diversity and the reintroduction of native fauna are desirable; and

Whereas, the wolf was, and could be a desirable complement to our faunal realm; and

Whereas, wolves are currently available for reintroduction from areas on the North American continent; and

Whereas, the New Mexico-Arizona Section of The Wildlife Society recognizes the inherent problems of anticipated or actual incompatibility of wolves with livestock operation; now

Therefore Be It Resolved that the New Mexico-Arizona Section of The Wildlife Society encourages the administrators of the United States Forest Service lands possessing wilderness characteristics, designed or de facto, within the historic range of wolves in Arizona and/or New Mexico to prepare management contingency plans to provide for the successful reintroduction of this species in limited numbers and area.

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AZ 12. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Pertaining to the Reintroduction of the Grizzly Bear into Arizona and New Mexico

Whereas, grizzly bears formerly occupied large areas of Arizona and New Mexico; and

Whereas, grizzly bears have been completely extirpated from Arizona and New Mexico since the 1930s; and

Whereas, there remain large areas of suitable habitat in Arizona and New Mexico in public ownership within the former distribution of grizzly bears; and

Whereas, the New Mexico-Arizona Section of The Wildlife Society is of the philosophy that species diversity and the reintroduction of native fauna are desirable; and

Whereas, grizzly bears are currently available for reintroduction from areas in the continental United States in and adjacent to lands administrated by the National Park Service; and

Whereas, the New Mexico-Arizona Section of The Wildlife Society recognizes the inherent problem of anticipated or actual incompatibility of grizzly bears with livestock operations; now

Therefore Be It Resolved that the New Mexico-Arizona Section of The Wildlife Society encourages the administrators of the United States Forest Service lands possessing wilderness characteristics, designated or de facto, within the historical range of grizzly bear in Arizona and/or New Mexico to prepare management and contingency plans to provide for the successful reintroduction of this species in limited numbers and areas.

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AZ 13. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Pertaining to Permitting Natural Fires on Public Lands

Whereas, interspersion of vegetative types and various stages of plant succession are not only important, but in some areas essential to wildlife survival; and

Whereas, fire plays an important role in providing both plant and animal species diversity; and

Whereas, man's influence on the ecology of an area by preventing all fires is more degrading to the environment than the air pollution caused by burning of wood; now

Therefore Be It Resolved that the New Mexico-Arizona Section of The Wildlife Society supports the courageous leadership shown by the National Park Service in allowing natural fires to burn under surveillance on the Saguaro National Monument when the prescribed conditions set forth in their management plan exists; and

Be It Further Resolved that the United States Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management be encouraged to utilize the same policy on the public lands they administer; and

Be It Further Resolved that the Environmental Protection Agency, in review of environmental statements, weigh all factors of the environment and consider all alternatives before passing judgment to eliminate burning because of the air pollution problem.

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AZ 14. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Pertaining to Construction of Swift Trail (Highway 366)

Whereas, the Penaleno Mountains of southeastern Arizona, although limited in area, present a diverse and scenic mosaic of floral and faunal habitats, many endemic to the area and which range in elevations from 3,000 to 10,700 feet; and

Whereas, the integrity of the range has been preserved through moderate development of recreation sites and access which provides for a high quality outdoor recreation experience for all persons regardless of transportation method; and

Whereas, the quality of recreation, aesthetic values, watershed, key wildlife habitats and general integrity of the range is definitely threatened by construction of a new highway and improvement of portions of the existing road; and

Whereas, justification of the construction is based only on the State Highway Department's requirements for slope easements and grade which cannot be met on the existing road and which must be met, under resent policies, if the State Highway Department is to continue maintenance of the road; and

Whereas, the opportunity to conserve the many values inherent to the area is at a critical but possible stage and with development of improved access this opportunity would be forever lost.

Be It Therefore Resolved that the Arizona Chapter of the New Mexico-Arizona Section of The Wildlife Society requests that the State Highway Department and the United States Department of Justice immediately halt all new construction and that any future road maintenance, regardless of agency responsibility, be limited to the preservation of the road in its present scenic and adequate state and further that the portions of new construction already completed be modified to reduce the present degrading impact as much as possible and to develop these areas to best serve the public need.

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AZ 15. Position Statement of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Relative to the Proposed Subdivision in San Rafael Valley, Santa Cruz County, Arizona

Be It Resolved that the Arizona Chapter, The Wildlife Society oppose implementation of the proposed subdivision in San Rafael Valley, Santa Cruz County, Arizona for the following reasons:

Whereas, the effects of this project will result in a considerable loss of wildlife habitat for resident and migratory species; and

Whereas, the loss of this habitat will result in the reduction of several wildlife species and the probable elimination of antelope from San Rafael Valley; and

Whereas, the impact of the increased human pressure on the recreation and natural resources of the surrounding area will decrease the quality of life for Arizona's citizens; and

Whereas, this area is the last undeveloped valley area in southeastern Arizona and, therefore, an extremely valuable asset for the people of this State; and

Whereas, because of the natural condition of San Rafael Valley, it is a valuable area for range management, wildlife management and other ecological studies,

We Therefore propose that San Rafael Valley be designated as an area to be preserved in its present condition so that future generations can enjoy and study a natural undisturbed grassland.

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AZ 16. Position Statement of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Relative to the Flood Control Project, Gila River and Tributaries Downstream from Painted Rock Reservoir, Arizona 

Be It Resolved that the Arizona Chapter, The Wildlife Society oppose implementation of the Lower Gila River Project for the following reasons:
Whereas, the effects of this project will result in a considerable loss of game habitat for resident and migratory species and,

Whereas, the loss of game will result in the loss of many recreational hours of Arizona and California sportsmen and,

Whereas, the effects of this project will result in the elimination of many nongame species, including the rare and endangered Yuma clapper rail, from the lower Gila River and,

Whereas, the professional wildlife biologists of this chapter believe that the effects of the proposed project and its ramifications on wildlife and the ecology of the area have not received adequate consideration,

We Therefore, support the many conservation organizations, groups and individuals including the Governor's Commission on Arizona Environment, the Arizona Wildlife Federation, Audubon Society, Sierra Club and the Yuma County Natural Resources Committee in opposition to this project.

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AZ 17. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Pertaining to the "Guns of Autumn"

The Arizona Wildlife Federation hereby expresses its sincere concern to the Columbia Broadcasting System and its affiliates for the biased documentary presented September 5, 1975, entitled "GUNS OF AUTUMN". The public was asked to draw conclusions on situations that are not typical. The documentary was not objective and failed to present the true values and motives of the vast majority of American hunters, and their concern for good sportsmanship, the conservation of natural resources and the welfare of wildlife. The Arizona Wildlife Federation respectfully requests that responsible representative organizations of the American be given an opportunity to respond to the documentary "GUNS OF AUTUMN" under the "Fairness Doctrine", if possible, prior to the schedule programming of "ECHOES OF GUNS OF AUTUMN" by CBS on September 20, 1975.

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AZ 18. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Pertaining to Feral Burros

Whereas, several scientific studies have clearly shown that feral burros in the Northern and Western portions of Arizona, namely the Grand Canyon National Park and the Bill Williams Big Sandy area are destroying habitat for wildlife on significant acreage, and

Whereas, it is clear that the burro population in these areas must be drastically reduced to prevent further deterioration to present and adjoining acreages, and

Whereas, Federal Land Management Agencies other than the Grand Canyon National Park have indicated no immediate program to adequately reduce burro numbers,

Now, Therefore Be It Resolved by the Arizona-New Mexico Section of The Wildlife Society that everything possible be done to encourage the Federal Land Management Agencies to control the excessive population now and to formulate and implement management plans that will allow for these depleted ranges to recover and prevent further occurrences of destruction by these feral animals.

Be It Further Resolved that Federal Legislation be developed and passed that will allow for sound practical methods of managing both wild horses and burros.

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AZ 19. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Pertaining to Dissolution of the Arizona-New Mexico Subsection

Whereas, the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society has reviewed the evolution of The Wildlife Society into the Arizona-New Mexico Administrative Section, the development of state chapters, the establishment of the New Mexico-Arizona Subsection, and the Council of Presidents governing body for the Southwest Section;

Whereas, we recognize the formative value the Arizona-New Mexico union has played in the development of a professional forum for conducting business of the Society in the Southwest and we believe the present organizational structure should continue to evolve;

Whereas, the state chapters have become self-sufficient units whose operation has not become so complex that an additional administrative layer is needed between them and the Southwest Section;

Whereas, it would strengthen the annual joint meeting of The Wildlife Society and American Fisheries Society of Arizona and New Mexico by appointing a joint committee whose sole function would be to continue the meeting in the form of an Arizona-New Mexico Natural Resources Conference;

Therefore Be It Resolved that the Arizona Chapter recommends that the New Mexico-Arizona Subsection be dissolved and the functions relative to producing the annual meeting be invested in a joint committee whose chairman will be selected at each annual meeting with a standing committee consisting of a representative from each of the state chapters of The Wildlife Society and the Arizona-New Chapters of the Fisheries Society.

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AZ 20. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Opposing the Sagebrush Rebellion

Whereas, the objective of the Sagebrush Rebellion is the ultimate conversion of federal public lands in Arizona to state and private ownership, and

Whereas, wildlife have generally benefited from the application of multiple use management practices on federal lands in Arizona, and

Whereas, economic considerations on state and private lands in Arizona historically tend to be shortsighted, which results in land abuse and often irreversible deterioration of wildlife habitat quality and land productivity, and

Whereas, opportunities for managing wildlife and their habitats are generally greater on pubic than on state or private lands in Arizona, and

Whereas, the individual citizen realizes a greater freedom of entry and recreation use of federal than state or private land in Arizona,

Therefore Be It Resolved that the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society is opposed to the Sagebrush Rebellion or any other attempt to divest federal lands from public ownership.

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AZ 21 Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Pertaining to the Tax Checkoff

Whereas, the stewardship of all wildlife of Arizona is vested by law in the Arizona Game and Fish Department and

Whereas, non-game animals are an important component of wildlife populations and

Whereas, the majority of the people of Arizona appreciate and are concerned with non-game as well as game animals and

Whereas, funding for the Arizona Game and Fish Department is generally derived from hunters, fishermen, and taxes on sporting goods and

Whereas, up to 15 percent of all Arizona Game and Fish Department funds are spent on non-game activities

Therefore Be It Resolved that the Arizona Legislature pass legislation to allow the taxpayers of Arizona to contribute by way of a "check-off" box on the State Income Tax form, all or any portion of any State income tax refund to the Arizona Game and Fish Department for use in non-game wildlife activities.

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AZ 22. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society On The Preservation of Old Growth Coniferous Forest Habitat

Whereas, the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society is a nonprofit organization of professional wildlife biologists, resource managers and others dedicated to managing and enhancing wildlife resources and their habitats; and

Whereas, the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society recognizes that all forms of wildlife are dependent on their environment and believes that habitat in many forms is essential to the continued existence of all wildlife species; and

Whereas, old growth coniferous forest habitat is critically important to over 20 wildlife species in the southwestern national forests; and

Whereas, the continued reduction of old growth coniferous forest stands from timber management activities threatens the continued existence of viable populations of old growth-dependent wildlife species; and

Whereas, Forest Land Management Plans are allocating acres of coniferous forest lands to be managed for old growth habitat but such plans may be years in litigation and review before being implemented thus delaying the time before old growth habitat allocations can be implemented; and

Whereas, during this interim acres of old growth forest could be reduced below that which have been allocated for old growth habitat management or necessary for protection of viable populations of old growth-dependent wildlife species.

Now, Therefore Be It Resolved that the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society recommends:

the immediate termination of all timber management activities in existing stands of old growth coniferous forest in southwestern national forests until such time as those acres allocated in individual Forest Land Management Plans can be implemented on the ground; and

that appropriate agencies or organizations increase the level and funding of research to define the amounts and distributions of old growth habitat to insure protection of viable populations of old growth-dependent wildlife species; and

that appropriate agencies or organizations increase the level and funding of research to define the degree of dependency of other wildlife species which rely on old growth forest for a portion of their habitat needs.

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AZ 23. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society On the Legislation for the Preservation and Enhancement of Riparian Habitats in the Private Sector

Whereas, the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society is a nonprofit organization of professional wildlife biologists, resource managers, and other dedicated to managing and enhancing wildlife resources and their habitats; and

Whereas, the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society recognizes that all forms of wildlife are dependent on their environment and believes that habitat in many forms is essential to the continue existence of all wildlife species; and

Whereas, riparian habitat is critically important to over 30 wildlife species in Arizona; and

Whereas, the continue reduction of riparian habitat through agricultural, recreational, range and water management practices threatens the continued existence of many riparian-dependent species; and

Whereas, in order to encourage preservation and enhancement of riparian habitats, it is necessary to generate a broad base of support within industry, conservation organizations, and the private sector; and

Whereas, protection of riparian habitats on private lands will lead to erosion control by stabilizing stream banks, more and better habitat for game and non-game wildlife, and provide cooler water for trout and other fish species.

Now, Therefore Be It Resolved that the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society recommends:

that the Arizona State Legislature should pass legislation granting tax incentives for riparian and fish habitat improvement based on Oregon State Senate Bill 397 entitled Riparian Tax Incentive Legislation; and

that conservation organizations in Arizona support and lobby for the passage of the said legislation.

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AZ 24. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society Pertaining to Integrated Resource Management of Arizona's National Forests

Whereas, the U.S. Forest Service is the primary agency charged with the management of Arizona's forested habitats, and

Whereas, Arizona's diverse forested habitats support a multitude of fish and wildlife species, and

Whereas, timber harvest on Arizona's National Forests represents a dominant land use, and

Whereas, timber harvest has the potential to benefit wildlife through creation of desired habitat conditions, and

Whereas, the Integrated Resource Management approach to the timber sale planning process has greatly improved wildlife objective setting related to timber harvest compared to previous approaches, and

Whereas, Integrated Resource Management has placed wildlife on a more equitable basis with all resources in the sale planning process, and

Whereas, timber sales developed under Integrated Resource Management better reflect the needs of wildlife and achieve wildlife goals and objectives, and

Whereas, Integrated Resource Management principles are also applicable to the management of a variety of resources including fuelwood, chaparral and livestock grazing.

Now, Therefore Be It Resolved that the Arizona Chapter supports the U.S. Forest Service in its aggressive implementation of Integrated Resource Management.

Be It Further Resolved that the Chapter recognizes the long-term benefits of Integrated Resource Management to the wildlife resource and urges the Forest Service to maintain its strong commitment to this approach to resource management in the future.

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AZ 25. Resolution of the Arizona Chapter of the Wildlife Society For Endorsement and Support of Project Wild

WHEREAS, Project WILD is a comprehensive wildlife education program developed cooperatively by the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and the Western Regional Environmental Education Council, and

WHEREAS, the goal of Project WILD is "to assist learners of any age in developing awareness, knowledge, skills and commitment to result in informed decisions, responsible behavior and constructive actions concerning wildlife and the environment upon which all life depends," and

WHEREAS, this goal is sought by providing an instructional program for teachers of kindergarten through high school age young persons, and

WHEREAS, Project WILD has received the endorsement and active support of forty states and eight national or international organizations, and

WHEREAS, Project WILD has been acknowledged for its merit and quality by awards or recognition from The Wildlife Society, National Wildlife Federation, North American Association for Environmental Education, Conservation Education Association, National Council for the Social Studies, National Science Teachers Association, and National Association of Biology Teachers, and

WHEREAS, Project WILD has been reviewed in depth by a specially appointed committee of the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and said committee reported that Project WILD materials were "well organized and presented, incorporates practical and proven teaching methods and maintains objective and unbiased positions in areas of social controversy, while exposing issues rather than avoiding them — a proper function of education," and further, states "Project WILD was found to be an excellent wildlife and environmental tool…"

NOW, BE IT RESOLVED by the Arizona Chapter of The Wildlife Society, in official meeting on January 29, 1987, that it does express its endorsement and support for Project WILD as a balanced and unbiased program which presents facts and guidance from which informed opinions can be made, and further does urge schools and organizations not utilizing Project WILD to consider incorporating this program into their educational efforts.

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AZ 26. Resolution For Consideration On "Wildlife User Fees For Federal Lands In Arizona"

WHEREAS, Federally managed lands account for a significant portion of the wildlife and fish-related recreation in Arizona, and

WHEREAS, increased demands are being placed on Federal land management agencies for wildlife and fish-related recreation associated with Arizona’s dramatic population growth, and

WHEREAS, Federal land management budgets are generally inadepquate to fully address this increased demand for wildlife and fish-related recreation, and

WHEREAS, the Sikes Act provides for the implementation of a “wildlife user fee” by the Federal land management agencies and the Arizona Game and Fish Department, and

WHEREAS, the substantial proceeds from a Sikes Act “wildlife user fee” would be dedicated to “on-the-ground” habitat management activities and would result in significantly increased recreational opportunities over time, and

WHEREAS, failure to implement a Sikes Act “wildlife user fee” may result in its elimination from the Act upon reauthorization by Congress, and

WHEREAS, implementation of a Sikes Act “wildlife user fee” will significantly improve wildlife and fish economic assessments in land management planning and decision making, making them more commensurate with actual value to the public.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, on 4 February 1988 in Safford, Arizona, that the Arizona Chapter recognizes the potential benefits associated with implementation of a Sikes Act “wildlife user fee” for Federal lands in Arizona.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Chapter stands committed to aggressive assessment of the potential implementation of a Sikes Act “wildlife user fee” for Federal lands in Arizona, and to acting in a capacity of facilitating its consideration by appropriate Federal and State agencies, and affected or interested private organizations.

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AZ 27. Resolution On The Sikes Act Wildlife Habitat Stamp Program For Arizona

WHEREAS, Federally managed lands account for a significant portion of the wildlife and fish-related recreation in Arizona, and

WHEREAS, increased demands are being placed on Federal land management agencies for wildlife and fish-related recreation associated with Arizona’s dramatic population growth, and

WHEREAS, Federal land management budgets are generally inadequate to fully address this increased demand for wildlife and fish-related recreation, and

WHEREAS, the Sikes Act (Public Law 93-452) provides for the implementation of a Public Land Management Area Stamp (“wildlife habitat stamp”) by the Federal land management agencies and the Arizona Game and Fish Commission, and

WHEREAS, the proceeds from a Sikes Act “wildlife habitat stamp” would be dedicated to “on-the-ground” habitat management activities and would result in significantly increased recreational opportunities over time, and

WHEREAS, failure to implement a Sikes Act “wildlife habitat stamp” may result in its elimination from the Act upon reauthorization by Congress, and

WHEREAS, implementation of a Sikes Act “wildlife habitat stamp” will significantly improve wildlife and fish economic assessments in land management planning and decision-making, making them more commensurate with actual value to the public.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED on February 2, 1989, that the Arizona Chapter recognizes the potential benefits associated with implementation of a Sikes Act “wildlife habitat stamp” for Federal lands in Arizona, and supports its implementation.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Chapter stands committed to aggressive public involvement in addressing implementation of a Sikes Act “wildlife habitat stamp” for Federal lands in Arizona, and to acting in a capacity of facilitation its consideration by appropriate Federal and State agencies, and affected or interested private organizations including consumptive and non-consumptive wildlife users.

Passed Unanimously
Silver City, New Mexico
February 2, 1989

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AZ 28. Resolution On An Arizona Environmental Policy Act

WHEREAS, the population of Arizona is projected to increase dramatically, approaching 5 million people by the year 2,000; and

WHEREAS, fish and wildlife and their habitats will accrue greater adverse impacts as a direct result of this population influx; and

WHEREAS, the maintenance of a quality environment now and in the future is a matter of statewide concern; and

WHEREAS, the public currently has no voice in the approval process for projects that are not under the jurisdiction of the National Environmental Policy Act; and

WHEREAS, prior to project implementation, activities involving state participation, financing, or approval should be evaluated for the presence of rare or unique resources and their importance in the preservation of biological diversity.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Arizona Chapter recognizes and supports the potential benefits associated with modification of the Arizona Environmental Quality Act to provide for preparation of an environmental report which would identify the significant effects of a project on the environment, identify alternatives to the project, and indicate the manner in which those significant effects can be mitigated or avoided.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Chapter stands committed to aggressive public involvement in addressing the implementation of such a provision and to acting in a capacity of facilitating its consideration by appropriate State agencies and affected or interested private organizations and citizens.

Passed Unanimously
Fort Huachuca, Arizona
June 17, 1989

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